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20121129
20121207
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MSNBCW 13
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English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
on chiapitol hill which is why so many have gone home. we know that president obama and john boehner spoke by phone. republican sources telling us they had a conversation yesterday. we don't have a readout on what that was about. we don't know that if any meetings have been scheduled. but any small sign of progress is welcome here on capitol hill. now with so many lawmakers headed home and likely to face the ire of their constituents, we saw one protester in baltimore yesterday over social security. there are a few left. today there's a joint economic committee hearing. they're going to hear from a top economist not only about the jobs numbers coming out tomorrow but also about what can be done to avoid this issue at the end of the year. >> tracie potts for us in washington. thank you. >>> last night on the ed show, steny hoyer explains why he thinks the debt ceiling vote should be taken off the table. >> the debt ceiling is a phone y vote, frankly. and from time to time democrats have made it an item that they demagogue down and the republicans have demagogued on it, as well. the debt lim
negotiations rewind to 2011 when boehner and president obama came within inches of a grand bargain, a deal that would have forced both democrats and republicans to eat their vegetables. in its comprehensive analysis of what happens during the secret negotiations, matt bai wrote -- the deal unraveled in large part because speaker boehner could not get his unruly caucus to go along with raising new revenue. fast forward to this year and republicans now think that deal, the one they walked away from, sounds pretty good. they're using it as a basis for their current proposal. only problem. boehner had his chance. president obama now thinks he has the upper hand. according to the "washington post's" ezra klein, quote -- >> joining us now representative chris van hollen of maryland, ranking member of the house budget committee. great to have you on the program. >> great to be with you, alex. >> let's talk a little bit about 2011 versus 2012, which is to say, the republican party is a very different negotiating position than they were last year and as ezra outlines, it sounds like john boehner wo
, the markets move very aggressively. yes, there is a case in point where boehner and obama said there was progress that could be made towards a compromise. the markets turn around to 220 points on the dow. but on 20 points and the dow having been down 110 closed up 106 points. that's because john boehner said they could well be some progress on a compromise. that flies in the face of harry reid saying little progress is made. that is what is driving the u.s. markets and the global markets as well. the fed's beige book says there is a tepid growth. you have the housing market against that manufacturing and superstorm sandy. interesting stats expected out of the auto sectors. this could be good news. we think there may ab a pace of somewhere in the region of 15.2 million cars sold in november. the fact is that americans got very old fleet of cars. the average age of car now is 11 years old. it's 20% of the cars on the road are 16 years old. maybe renewing the cars is a big factor. great numbers for abercrombie and fitch, the shares are up 15%. this is a very well received set of n
. boehner and the republicans have to be aware of where obama's at in his own head and with his colleagues, which is no deal without some increase in rates, or we go over the cliff. >> let me just add one thing. when obama made that initial offer, we talked a little bit about how, you know, it was a wish list. it was ideological, whatever you want to say. i think it actually helped boehner in some respects because it gave him three or four things that he could then go back to his caucus and say, look, i moved obama off of this, this and this. and when boehner put his offer out there, you started to see what could potentially be a chip-trading process going on here, whereby you have some give on, you know, cpi, the inflation index for social security, and in exchange boehner would agree to some marginal rate in the tax rates. now the people need to start figuring out what they want to give and take. >> the only difference i would say, steve, between what the president wants and john boehner is it's not what john boehner wants. it's what john boehner can deliver. >> yeah. >> and this is a si
'reling going to be able to get a deal without it. >> speaker boehner's counter offer yesterday to president obama which included a mythical increase in tax revenue of $800 billion obtained by reducing or eliminating unspecified tax deductions was taken seriously by no one in the senate except republican jim demipt. speaker boehner's $800 billion tax hike will destroy american jobs. the heritage foundation skewered the boehner counteroffer on its blog. at first blush, it appears little more than categorical preemptive capitulation. to be fair, the details of the republican proposal are extraordinarily vague to the extent it can be interpreted from the hazy details that it is utterly unacceptable. president obama said today there is a time and a place to discuss reforming the tax code. but that time is not now. >> what i've suggested is let's put a down payment on taxes, let's let tax rates on the upper income folks go up. let's let those go up. and then let's set up a process with a time certain at the end of 2013 or the fall of 2013 where we work on tax reform. we look at what loopholes and
the white house learned during the first term is that there are some things that work for obama and some things that don't. sitting down at a table with john boehner as essentially equals did not turn out as well as they might have hoped with the debt ceiling talks in 2011. but what did work was that winter when the president went to the country and argued for extending the payroll tax holiday and developed pressure outside of washington, he was a lot more successful. so they have two goals here. one is to keep the pressure coming from outside the beltway and the second is to make sure that this is not a negotiation between the president and boehner, that they want the president essentially floating above this. >> robert, when we talk and i know you had a chance to hear what congresswoman black will to say about trying to find the right balance here, while a majority of americans, say they go completely support raising taxes on wealthier americans, there is also a majority support that says we don't want to see earned benefits messed with, we don't want to see the medicare eligibility ag
that wants to hear this message. they don't want to hear boehner capitulate. if you read a lot of the right wing sides, not the crazy ones, they're already teeing up to say boehner is a failure, he gave into obama. they want to hear him talk the talk. while he still has the rejectionists in hand in the lame duck caucus and while he has that donor class that wants to hear this conservative rhetoric, he's still got to play the game. behind the scenes i think republicans understand they're going to lose that top rate fight. they're going to lose that, and i wouldn't be surprised if they wound up putting the debt ceiling into the deal at the end, but up until the moment they make the deal, he's got to talk the talk. >> if i was only interested in right wing money and money at the top, i would say that's all true and, therefore, the faster they make a deal the better because if they're going to raise the rate anyway, get it over with. >> it would be better for the republicans if they make a deal now. >> boehner can make a better deal now. the question is whether anyone in the party will let him
and was criticizing boehner for rolling over as he saw it on the deal with obama. >> everybody is playing this down. i don't. eric ericsson wrote his supporters an e-mail saying this, without jim demint we would most likely not presently have in the united states senate pat tomby, rand paul, mike lee, marco rubio, jeff flake, ron johnson, ted cruz. we had not have a republican establishment that worries that conservatives might actually primary them. de menthe also had backed candidates who went on to lose their general elections. richard mourdock in indiana, christine o'donnell in delaware, ken buck out in colorado. bob, i'm going to back to this again. when the chief ramrod of the rift wing senate candidates leaves the post, who would replace him? how is this good news for the right? >> look, i'm not saying whether it's good news or bad news, i'm tell you what i think his calculation is. his calculation is he can be more of a free agent. i think he will get very involved in primaries, he will push hard right issues. i wish him well because the candidates e succeeded in nominating have quite often lo
and in some of the those savings are actually tax increases. >> perry, is speaker boehner's biggest problem going to be pleasing those in his own party who don't want to raise taxes, or getting the other side to cut more entitlements? >> the tax problem is the biggest problem. president obama has laid out in the past and seen willing to me, at least, to make some cuts to medicare. maybe not ones conservatives like. what we don't know yet, the big question is, president obama is pushing for $1 trillion in tax increases, pushing it for a long time. he feels he has a mandate on that now. we know his idea is about raising revenue. we don't know what the republicans ideas are on the revenue. that's what we need to know. that's the whole question, what are they. go ahead. >> we've heard from lindsey graham yesterday or the day before with regards to revenue. he still contends, ari, that you can raise a significant chunk of revenue, he's thrown out $800 billion at least by closing loopholes and limiting deductions, whether it's $30,000, $40,000, $50,000. >> yeah, but he's just talking, right? just
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)